Germany

CDU wants to combine economic growth and with environmental protection measures to gradually implement the climate goals:they placing an emphasis on the power of the social market economy.

SPD backs a social-ecological transformation with ambitious climate and energy goals, womxn’s quotas and tough sanctions for non-compliance with environmental and human rights in the global supply chain.

Grüne Die Grüne have the strongest targets for combating hazardous chemicals. Their policies have a feminist and gender-just orientation. They set high goals for the banning of plastic and access to drinking water.

Die Linke has the most ambitious climate and energy targets, with emphasis on social justice. Hazardous chemicals, plastic waste, period poverty and the global exploitation are an absolute No-Go. They want an united, social and environmental Europe, which places nature and the environment above profit and acts according to the motto “for a unified Europe of the millions, against a Europe of the millionaires”.

AfD promotes Europe as an economic and interest community of sovereign states, seeks the dissolution of the European Parliament and will work toward DEXIT in the case of the non-fulfilment of this reform – Germany’s exit from the EU. They want to cease all existing climate protection measures, promote the former, polluting industries and the return of traditional gender roles within career and family life.

FDP places great weight on investments in technology, in particular in a technology transfer to Asian and African countries where they anticipate emissions can be reduced most efficiently. Lacks social analysis.

Fem Partei uses a global gender analysis of the impacts of climate change and the urgency of climate change measures, with a goal to cover 100% of energy demands with regenerative energies and decentralised structures.

Freie Wähler considers climate change measures important but seek to achieve this through private sector competition and not through public regulations. There is a lack of urgency regards climate change measures and FW attach importance the escalating refugee crisis as reason for action. Social analysis is lacking for the most part.

Ecofeminist scorecard

Remember, the scorecard is a first step in finding your way through party jargon. It is based on party manifestos. From past experience, we know that manifestos can be filled with empty words. So we encourage you to dig deeper, to read articles and look at how they have voted within the EU in the past. It might also be useful to check up which EU group your party belongs to, and the EU parties' manifestos.

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Committed

This scoring indicates that the party has made a strong social impact analysis on the issue and mentioned many of policies which is listed under the heading on the left-hand side on the scorecard.

Partially committed

This scoring indicates that the party has progressive demands around the issue, but the social impact analysis is lacking or very weak.

Not committed

This scoring indicates that the party has either not mentioned the issue at all in their manifesto, or the committment is there but it is very vague as to how they will achieve it. It might also mean that the party is actively opposed taken action on the issue.

Scoring

Drastic action on climate change, now!

CDU 

Wants to ratify and implement the findings of the Katowice and Paris Climate Conferences. Seeks global pricing on CO2 emissions. Lacks urgency and social analysis of impacts of climate change. Places emphasis on making climate action compatible with economic growth.

SPD 

Addresses Europe’s responsibility for the global impacts of climate change, climate justice and the urgency of climate action. Aims to reduce GHG  by 45% by 2030 (base year 1990), and for GHG neutrality by 2050. Committed to progressing research into the social-ecological impacts, implementing measures and structural changes to prevent climate change. Wants to find a new North-South strategy and develop international relations centred around the promotion of human rights, peace, sustainable development and reassess the approach to overcoming structural inequalities. Wants to introduce the greater involvement of youth and interest groups in consultations regards climate change protection. Lacks gender analysis.

Grüne 

Promotes ambitious climate goals to mitigate the climate crisis as swiftly as possible. Wants to reduce CO₂ emissions by at least 55% by 2030 (base year 1990). Address climate justice and Europa’s role in the climate crisis. Wants to promote EU as union serving climate action. Climate should be at the fore of foreign, security and peace policies. Considers climate action as a intersectional imperative, e.g. green loans and environmental transparency in the financial market. Want a pan-European nail network and for the transportation of goods to be carried out by rail and not by road. Gender analysis in consideration of climate impacts, adaptations and measures. Promotes gender equal distribution of funding through Gender Budgeting and simplified access to funds for local projects and communities.

Die Linke 

Wants socially just climate measures, values nature and environment above profit, wants to reduce EU emissions by at least 65% by 2030 compared to 1990, by 95% by 2050. Supports a UN compensation scheme for the impacts of climate change and colonisation financed by the industrialised nations (former colonial powers) and an exchange of knowledge and technology with the Global South.

AfD 

The AfD denies human-driven climate change and rejects policies toward climate change protection. Aims to suspend all climate change measures. Is against extending national parks, diesel and vehicle bans and the abolition of private transport, as according to the AfD the air quality in cities is gradually improving despite increasing traffic. According to AfD current NO2 levels are safe and not hazardous to health.

FDP 

They consider climate protections as the global community’s responsibility, especially that of the international free trade. They support energy and climate protection measures via global emissions trade. They seeks to abolish fossil fuel CO2 emissions rights by 2050 (or earlier), and are striving to reduce CO2 emissions with the introduction of CO2 reducing technologies within the industry. Economic growth is a priority, with climate goals being on the long term side, regulated through market activity, competition and technological transparency. Lacks social and gender analysis, as well as acknowledgement of historical responsibility toward the Global South.

Fem Partei 

Global gender analysis of the impacts of, and the adaptations / measures for climate change, as well as an acknowledgement of the historical responsibility toward the Global South. Wants a transition to a more sustainable and ecological agriculture, global forest conservation and the promotion of products from third countries whose production is environmentally sound, to fully realise the circular economy, and to prevent further coal-fired power stations. Seeks to restructure settlements patterns, workplaces and supply infrastructure to reduce reliance on private transportation and to establish a more accessible, affordable public transport network.

Freie Wähler 

Wants to achieve the Paris Agreement goals through joint climate and sustainability policies, to harmonise competitiveness and the mitigation of climate change, to create climate stabilising forests and their sustainable cultivation. Acknowledges the great ability of more attractive train connections to lower reliance pan-European air traffic, wants to prioritise the research of climate neutral technologies within the transport sector. Promotes the reduction of the emissions within the transport industry via private sector competition, i.e. without state intervention. Lacks urgency regards the implementation of climate change protection as well as social analysis.

Gender-just energy transition

CDU 

Supports the establishment of new branches and the creation of new employment opportunities within former brown coal areas, wants to secure innovations within the energy union, to promote clean, affordable energy and the extension of low-emission or renewable energies, to develop internationally effective carbon pricing to safeguard Europe’s competitive position, to secure Germany’s and Europe’s role a forerunner in the development of artificial  intelligence, e.g. Smart House, which can autonomously regulate efficient energy usage within the home. Lacks social and gender analysis, no mention of decentralising infrastructure or energy goals, prioritising a wide range and promoting competition.

SPD 

Want the establishment of an EU fund for a fair transition, to support the affected areas EU-wide and to secure families’ livelihoods through industrial and socio-political investments. Wants a EU-wide nuclear wide phase-out, and an energy transition for electricity, heating, cooling and transport. They are for an internationally binding GHG / carbon pricing scheme to secure European competitiveness and drastically reduce the production of climate changing emissions. They support the goal of a 32.5% energy efficiency within the EU by 2030. Partial social analysis, stronger involvement of youth and interest groups, no demands for decentralised infrastructure and lacks gender analysis.

Grüne 

Against coal, nuclear and other fossil fuels, want divestment, a renewable energy union strategy, as well as centralised and decentralised structures. Demand European electricity and gas networks which will help spur the transition and balance out the natural supply fluctuations with renewable energies. Want 100% renewable energies in Europe by 2050 and 45% by 2030. They demand improvements to energy efficiency by 40% by 2030 (basis year 1990). They want to revoke the energy charter treaty, which grant corporations special privileges, thereby thwarting the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg. They want direct participation from communities, regions and non-profit organisations within the formal European decision making processes. They lack gender and social analysis, especially in the realisation of the energy transition and the affected coal industry areas.

Die Linke 

Die Linke want local/grassroot energy supply, kept in the public and cooperative sector, to wind up EURATOM, to phase out by 2030, are against fracking. Wants social and environmental restructuring with new employment opportunities in the coal industry regions (500 million euros from the German budget for structural change and social security protection. Demand 100% renewable energy in EU by 2040, 45% by 2030, also decentralised. They want a ticketless, nationwide, barrier free public transport network and car-free inner cities. They want to eradicate energy poverty and to control prices for gas and electricity via state price supervision.

AfD 

Want to further promote an energy mix consisting of coal, oil, gas, water power and nuclear. Want to extend the North Stream Pipeline 2 and the development of ports as LNG-terminals. They resist the further extension of renewable energies. Lacks social or gender analysis and support for decentralised structures.

FDP 

Wants to achieve an energy transition; one in which profitability, supply guarantees, climate sustainability and social acceptance are prioritised. To achieve this they demand the liberalisation of the energy single market and the extension of the transeuropean network. They demand the extension of the European Emission Trade System in the energy sector, especially in the transport, heating and agricultural sectors. They support affordable transport, the participation of local residents in the planning of infrastructure projects, with reduced project times, improved and simplified cross border tariffs from transport unions. They lack concrete energy goals, accepts that the market and competition will determine the energy mix, does not mention the need for decentralised structures, as well as gender or social analysis.

Fem Partei 

Their goal is to cover fully energy demand by regeneratives energies, to secure decentralised structures, to introduce policies for greater energy efficiency (within industry, the household, transport and trade), to resist any new coal-fired power stations, with gas only as an interim solution and finally the extension for of heat and power generation systems. They are against nuclear energy for greater participation of women in the energy sector. They fail to mention any social implications in the affected regions resulting from the structural reform.

Freie Wähler 

Want a European energy transition, without reliance on nuclear or coal power, with a decentralised energy supply system, but support the DESERTEC project, which envisages securing energy production via thermal solar energy and photovoltaics in North Africa, reducing the EU’s dependence on oil impacts and also providing economic advantages for African countries, and also elevating migration to Europe. Against fracking. No concrete energy goals, lacks social and gender analysis.

Toxic chemicals, no thank-you!

CDU 

Apart from mentioning that sponsoring the digitalisation of agriculture can lead to resource saving, more environmentally sound production which can also reduce the usage of pesticides and herbicides

SPD  

Due to environmental concerns, they want to end the usage of glyphosate and other harmful herbicides.

Grüne 

Address the environmental and health risks posed by chemicals found in everyday produces, e.g. food, clothing, cosmetics and utensils. Demanding fewer pesticides, antibiotic free animal rearing and no to glyphosate, PVC and PVC plasticisers, for stricter thresholds and bans on hazardous substances, a register for nano-plastics and a strict definition for nanoparticles to close off loopholes. Demand more regard be given to gender specific issues in the areas of sexual, reproductive and maternal health.

Die Linke 

They are aware of the environmental and health risks which chemicals pose. They demand stringent compliance with the precautionary principle in regulating hormone altering substances, heath before profit. Want to drastically reduce the usage of chemical pesticides and herbicides, want to introduce obligatory labelling requirements on products treated with pesticides and fungicides, against the prolonged authorisation of glyphosate. No social or gender analysis.

AfD 

No mention

FDP 

Apart from potential for the digitalisation of the agricultural industry to reduce the use of pesticides and herbicides.

Fem Partei 

They speak out against the use of chemical substances, for example in the agricultural industry and in the healthcare sectors, yet lacks concrete measures for this reduction.

Freie Wähler 

They are against the use of growth hormones in the agricultural industry so long as the risks they pose are unclear. They want further research into the impacts on hormones. They are against the spreading liquid manure and against the use of glyphosate. Due to environmental concerns they want to introduce a fourth wastewater treatment standard, to enable the filtering out of antibiotic residues, hormones other bioactive substances, right down to microplastic particles.

Safe water for all

CDU 

No mention

SPD 

They only mention that clean water for all (today and for all future generations) is a environmental goal.

Grüne 

They recognise access to clean water as a human right and address the limited access to drinking water sanitation for almost 2 million people in Europe. They support the European citizens’ initiative Right2Water. They are against the privatisation of public water supplies. For the ambitious implementation of the Water Framework Directive. They want to drive back the usage of antibiotics, the surplus of animal manure and the usage of pesticides.

Die Linke 

Fighting for affordable access to water for all, as water is a human right. They are against privatisation. They want resolute and complete implementation of the Water Framework Directive. No social analysis.

AfD 

No mention

FDP 

No mention

Fem Partei 

They recognise the urgency of current water shortages and the need to improve access to water for all, the global responsibility for climate change with gender analysis. Are against privatisation of water supplies.

Freie Wähler 

Wants to nationalise drinking water and sewage.

Period power for all

CDU 

No mention

SPD 

No mention

Grüne 

No mention

Die Linke 

Wants a reduced tax of 7% for menstrual hygiene products such as tampons and pads, as such products are not luxuries. Wants to bring taxes in line with the lowest rate within the EU.

AfD 

No mention

FDP 

No mention

Fem Partei 

No mention

Freie Wähler 

No mention

Act on single-use and micro-plastic

CDU 

Want to end the plastic food in our world’s oceans, to end the usage of micro and nano plastics through a EU-wide strategy and an international agreement on reducing plastics.

SPD 

Want to transform our single use / throw away society through the usage of long lasting products, targeting excessive packaging, extensive recycling and multi-use systems, a ba on certain single use plastics and a cost sharing scheme for manufacturers as well as legal requirements to create waste reducing, recyclable products, a Eco-Design directive and a structuring a EU-Plastic Strategy.

Grüne 

Demand an end to plastic pollution, a ban on microplastics in cosmetics and body care products. They want to reduce packaging waste by 50% by 2030, and ensure all plastic products used within the EU are reusable or completely recyclable (affordably).

Die Linke 

Wants to achieve zero plastic as far as is  possible via an effective EU plastic strategy and to ban the use of microplastics.

AfD 

No mention

FDP 

References the consequences of climate change such as the plastic pollution and how this represents one the greater hazards to our habitats.

Fem Partei 

No mention

Freie Wähler 

Wants to drastically reduce the amount of plastic waste and the improve the options to recycle and reuse, to introduce a fourth phase in the treatment of wastewater treatment filter out microplastic particles. No mention of bans of micro or nano plastic.

Slow down fashion

CDU 

No mention

SPD 

Demands the obligation on and verification of European firms which operate outside of the EU toward the standards of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) Wants a common strategy to eradicate forced labour, serious industrial accidents and child labour, supports Initiative Alliance 8.7 (also sanctions for non-compliance. Wants more multilateral treaties for environmental, social and transparent global trade. Wants a EU action plan “Humane Work in the Global Production Chain” and a binding duty of care.

Grüne 

Wants fair fashion to be default, with a European directive on transparency within the entire production and supply chain of the fashion industry and the observance of concrete duty of care obligations. Demand long-lasting products, which are repairable and recyclable, with the European “right to repair”, meaning the manufacturer is obliged to produce repair parts/items as well as directions as for reparation. Wants binding European laws against products which are made intentionally “short-life” while also ensuring recycling through manufacturer’s obligation to take back goods.

Die Linke 

Want decent working conditions and environmentally-sound production methods to be the norm within global production and and supply chains, legally binding duty of care on companies; in the textile industry and other sectors. Wants a reform of the World Trade Organisation (WTO).

AfD 

No mention

FDP 

Wants to improve prosperity in Europe through increased free trade: acknowledge rule-based free trade as the basis for international trade relations and strive toward a global free trade arrangement within the auspices of the WTO. Supports bilateral trade agreements, advocate more modern, transparent free trade agreements. Environmental and social aspects were not mentioned.

Fem Partei 

No mention

Freie Wähler 

Want fair and sustainable foreign trade with developing countries, a value-orientated restructuring of the European trade policy; in particular trade with Africa, to end poverty, suffering and growing migration.

Gender quotas

CDU 

Only mentions equality for womxn and men in the social market economy and improved compatibility between family and career for men and womxn.

SPD 

Demands resolution on a EU-wide quota for womxn on executive boards. Wants the creation of EU-wide funding programmes, which will in particular support womxn’s careers in STEM sectors.

Grüne 

Wants further support for womxn founders, concrete measures against wage disparities (through  European wage disclosure laws). Wants the extension of initiatives against discrimination within the workplace and the promotion of womxn within STEM sectors, quotas within executive and management boards, binding parity within governing committees of EU institutions, stringent directives for upholding a balanced mix of work and care responsibilities, as well as freetime and voluntary engagements, feminist EU-foreign policy, gender mainstreaming and the equal participation of womxn and minorities within all levels of implementation and negotiation.

Die Linke  

Supports a new, flexible working relationship with working times between 22 and 35 hours per work (with entitlement to at least 22 hours), equal pay for men and womxn, parity within parliament and further support for feminist movements, e.g. for their career progression.

AfD 

Promotes the traditional family model, in which the father and mother take on long-term care responsibilities for their children. They strive for equal opportunities for men and womxn, they reject the stigmatisation of traditional gender roles, but support the abolishment of the European funds for gender research and are against encouragement of employment for both parents due to the dual burden and impacts of external childcare for 1-3 years olds on their psychological development.

FDP 

FDP considers the implementation of laws against the prevention of discrimination of women in public and private sectors as sufficient. Wants to promote and implementation of European wide women rights. Wants to extend the annual reporting of the EU commission on the equality of men and womxn in the EU, in order to discuss further the status of womxn’s rights and aspects of structural discrimination against womxn, among other things: within politics (e.g. access to candidate lists during elections and to political institutions).

Fem Partei 

Wants to introduce a quota of 50% within all employment sectors, in both the private and public sector, particularly within the energy sector.

Freie Wähler 

No mention


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Sustainable development

The demands used on this scorecard are based on the issues that matters to us based on the work we do on Agenda 2030 and sustainable development. We have work on climate justice (SDG 13), sustainable energy solutions (SDG 7, 13, 15), a toxic free and healthy environment (SDG 3, 8, 11, 12), safe and clean water and menstruation (SDG 4, 6, 8, 16) through a gender equality (SDG 5) and human rights lens.